NVIDIA RTX Performance Explained

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NVIDIA RTX Performance explain by Paul Arden – miGenius

NVIDIA RTX technology was announced late last year and has gathered a lot of coverage in the press. Many software vendors have been scrambling to implement support for it since then and there has been a lot of speculation about what is possible with RTX. Now that Iray RTX is finally about to be part of RealityServer we can talk about what RTX means for our customers and where it will be most beneficial for you.

RTX

Iray RTX speed-up is highly scene dependent but can be substantial. If your scene has low geometric complexity then you are likely to only see a small improvement. Larger scenes can see multiples of about a 2x speed-up while extremely complex scenes can even see a 3x speed-up.

What is RTX?

RTX is both software and hardware. The key enabling innovation introduced with RTX hardware is a new type of accelerator unit within the GPU called an RT Core. These cores are dedicated purely to performing ray-tracing operations and can do so significantly faster than using traditional general purpose GPU compute. Performance will depend on how many RT Cores your card has. The Quadro RTX 6000 for example has 72 RT Cores.

Quadro RTX 6000

Along side the new hardware, NVIDIA has introduced various APIs and SDKs which enable software developers to access these new RT Cores. For example, in the gaming world RTX hardware is accessed through the Microsoft Direct X Ray-tracing APIs (DXR). While production rendering tools such as Iray use OptiX.

Rendering software must be modified to take advantage of the new software APIs and SDKs in order to access the hardware. With RTX hardware and the latest RealityServer release, the portion of rendering work performed by Iray that involves ray intersection and computation of acceleration structures (see below) can be offloaded to the new RT Core hardware, greatly speeding up that part of the rendering computation.

Ray Intersection and Acceleration Structures

Ray intersection is the work of determining whether a ray (just think of it as a straight line) crosses through a given primitive (e.g., a triangle). We won’t cover exactly how path-tracers like Iray work but Disney have a great video Practical Guide to Path Tracing which gives you a good idea of the basics. You’ll quickly see that ray intersection is key to making this work.

While the mathematics involved in checking if a ray intersects a primitive is relatively simple (at least for a triangle), scenes today can easily contain millions or even hundreds of millions of primitives. To make matters worse for typical scenes you also need to perform these checks for millions of rays. That’s millions of primitives times millions of rays, a whole lot of computation.

Naively checking for intersections with all primitives doesn’t cut it, you’d be waiting years for your images. To speed things up, when using ray-tracing, an acceleration structure is almost always also used. This uses some pre-computation to split the scene up into a hierarchy of primitives that can be tested rapidly to eliminate large numbers of those primitives from consideration quickly.

As a very simple example, imagine you have a scene with a million primitives to test distributed fairly evenly. If you cut the scene into two groups, you can first test whether a ray intersects with the volume of one of the groups and if it does not you can immediately exclude half of the primitives. By nesting structures like this you can progressively test until you reach the primitive that is intersected

While this is a massively over-simplified example and there is a lot of subtlety and nuance to implementing a highly optimised system for this, the basic principle remains the same. Devise a cheap test that can eliminate as many primitives from consideration as possible. RT Core hardware accelerates the query of acceleration structures and the ray intersection calculations making the whole process significantly faster.

BVH

Enough Already, How Much Faster?

It depends. Yes, everyone hates this answer but no way around it here. We’ve so far seen a typical range, for practical scenes, from 5%-300%. That is a pretty wide range, so what determines how much faster it will be? We didn’t describe what ray intersection was above just for fun.

Notice that when we talked about ray intersection we never talk about materials, textures, lighting, global illumination, shadows or any of the other jargon commonly associated with photorealistic rendering. That is because for a renderer to do its job, it has to do much more than just ray intersections, even if it calls itself a ray-tracer.

All of the calculations needed for solving light transport, evaluating materials, looking up textures, calculating procedural functions and so on are still being performed on the traditional GPU compute hardware using CUDA (at least in the case of Iray). This portion of the rendering calculation is not being accelerated by RTX. So how much ray intersection is being done in a typical rendering with Iray for example?

RT Compute Ratio

In many scenes, we found that ray intersection comprises only 20% of the total work being performed by rendering. This is a very important point. Even if the new RT Cores were to make ray intersection infinitely fast so that it takes no time, 80% of the work still remains in that scene. So a 100 second render would still take 80 seconds with RTX acceleration, giving a speed-up of 1.25x (25%). Of course, ray intersection is not free with RTX, just faster, so the speed-up would be lower than this but this is the hypothetical upper limit.

If you have a scene where 60% of the work is ray intersection you will naturally see a much more significant speed-up. In that case on a 100 second render, with an infinitely fast ray intersector you still have 40 seconds of rendering, giving a speed-up of 2.5x (250%) at the hypothetical upper limit. In general we have found RTX provides the greatest benefit in very complex scenes with millions of triangles and also scenes that heavily exploit instancing.

Real-world Performance Testing

We took 14 scenes we had available and tested them on a Quadro RTX 6000 card with Iray 2018.1.3 and Iray RTX 2019.1.0 to evaluate the speed-up.

Above you can see we’ve also included an estimate of the percentage of the rendering time that is associated with ray tracing where available. This gives a clear picture of how this directly affects how much speed-up you get by using RTX hardware. It is also clear that the more complex scenes benefit a lot more since they spend more time doing ray intersection.

Unfortunately the strong scene dependence of RTX performance means there is no single number you can give to describe the performance advantage when integrated into a full renderer like Iray. Any way you cut it, you’ll definitely get a performance boost from RTX, exactly how much will depend on your scenes.

One bonus not considered here is that the inference part of the AI Denoiser in Iray can be accelerated by the Tensor Core units on the RTX cards, much the same way as was seen on Volta based hardware. This can be quite useful on larger image sizes when using the denoiser. There is also a more general performance bump that comes with the new version of Iray that is unrelated to RTX and a significant speed up in Iray Interactive mode for real-time use cases.

Tesla T4 and Cloud Providers

The NVIDIA Tesla T4 card which is increasingly used in the data-center and becoming available at various cloud providers actually also contains RT Core hardware (40 RT Cores) even though it doesn’t have the RTX branding. This isn’t emphasised in marketing material so is easy to miss.

For many of our customers, availability of hardware at popular cloud providers is important since they are often not deploying on their own hardware. As of writing both Google Compute Engine now has the Tesla T4 in general availability while Amazon Web Services have Tesla T4 based instances in beta and should be in general availability soon.

Making a Decision

We get a lot of questions from customers on whether they should be looking at RTX hardware for RealityServer. It certainly gives more options to consider and now it is important to think about your content as well when making a purchasing decision. If you deal with highly complex scenes, there is little doubt that RTX is worthwhile and the price points of RTX hardware, compared to say Volta based hardware make them very compelling even if they don’t quite reach the performance of Volta on smaller scenes. When comparing to Pascal or Maxwell based cards, RTX cards are a pretty clear winner in price/performance and they walk all over older Kepler based cards.

The best way to make a decision is to benchmark a representative scene or scenes from your own content rather than our generic benchmark tests. Our benchmarks will give you a good feeling for the difference between cards as a baseline, but you need to test your own data to determine how much additional benefit you will get on RTX hardware. If you’re a RealityServer customer or considering purchasing RealityServer and have scene data we can help you with these tests, contact us to learn more.

DaVinci Resolve Efficiently Grades on a Tight Budget

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DaVinci Resolve Efficiently Grades on a Tight Budget

http://postproduction.digitalmedianet.com see original article

for pricing and support see here:

Robbie Carman, co owner of postproduction finishing company Amigo Media, excitedly joined the project in 2012 as its colorist. As with every other aspect of the film, the deadlines were short and finances were tight. Robbie turned to DaVinci Resolve to get the job done.

 

Before

 

After

 

First, Robbie received the cut film from the editors. The film was edited in Adobe Premier Pro using footage from various source media at different frame rates and frame sizes. In Resolve 9, selecting the “Handle mixed frame rate material” checkbox in the Master Project Settings panel allowed Robbie to painlessly conform the project.


“There was a lot of snow in this movie. It’s a difficult element to grade and get the tonal ranges to match, so each scene flows seamlessly into the next,” Robbie described. By viewing the clips in Gallery mode or using a Split Screen of two shots, he could easily compare the tone of each shot. The power of multi GPU processing and the Resolve Control Surface also sped up the entire workflow, providing tactile control over every single parameter.
For the interview scenes, Robbie relied on the flexibility of Resolve’s Power Windows and tracking. By placing Power Windows in a scene, he could sharpen the features of an interviewee’s face or darken and blur a window, making the interview even more compelling.

 

Before

 

After

 

“One of the ENG cameras was set on Auto Iris and Auto Exposure during the shoot,” said Robbie. “As the camera moves and subtle light changes happen, the exposure fluctuates. Covering the more gratuitous exposure changes with key frames in Resolve is very easy and it makes the film flow much better.”


Once he had finished the grade, Robbie used Resolve to quickly and simultaneously render out H.264 and ProRes versions of the film. “Having all the deliverables for review in one place at the same time is a huge productivity booster,” Robbie explained. “I don’t have to go back to Final Cut Pro or Premier to render out new files. By doing it all it Resolve, it’s a huge time saver.”

 

Capture SD and HD broadcast video to H.264

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Capture SD and HD broadcast video to H.264 files!

 

h264prorecorder

 

 

Capture broadcast video in HD or SD quality to H.264 for websites using this versatile easy to use Blackmagic H.264 converter realtime on the fly.

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H264 Pro Realtime Encoder Recorder

The perfect low-cost way to capture from professional broadcast decks directly to SD and HD H.264 files via USB!

With new ways of delivering content to consumers, now it’s easy to capture old or new programming content into the same file format used on the web, iPad, iPod, iPhone, Apple TV, YouTube and more! Capture directly from SDI, HDMI and component analogue video with embedded SDI, HDMI and balanced analogue audio inputs. RS-422 deck control is included with software for Mac, Windows and Linux!

NB: HDMI input is unable to capture from copy protected HDMI sources. Always confirm copyright ownership before capture or distribution of content.

For more information see here

 

Available by calling for more information 1300 030655 or from our smarttec.com.au store with support.

FREE DaVinci Resolve

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DaVinci Resolve: The Free Version

Released: DaVinci Resolve Lite

BlackMagic has posted a Public Beta of DaVinci Resolve Lite: a free version of BlackMagic’s $1,047.20 DaVinci Resolve for Mac. You can select the details here from this link for a 265Mb download:

DaVinci Resolve Lite includes all the same high quality processing of the full DaVinci Resolve. However it limits projects to HD resolutions or less, only two color correction nodes, a single processing GPU and a single RED rocket card. Stereoscopic 3D features, noise reduction, Power Mastering, remote grading, and sharing projects using an external database server are features only offered in the full DaVinci Resolve and so are not included in this free DaVinci Resolve Lite edition. Customers who want to eliminate these restrictions can purchase the full DaVinci Resolve Software for only A$1,047.20

The removed features seem pretty reasonable. The 2-node restriction doesn’t allow for the more complicated Parallel, Key, and Mix nodes – which are ‘power user’ features. Yet it still supports a GPU + Red Rocket card.

BlackMagic has struck a nice balance between giving away a very powerful color grading solution but holding back enough key features that owners of the paid versions won’t complain too much.

The download can be found here. Select MacOS > DaVinci Resolve > DaVinci Resolve Lite then fill in your details to download this free app.

3-Way Color Subtab

This Lite version is pretty big news but don’t lose sight of a brand new interface that makes this Lite version much more accessible to the people most likely to use it… mouse-only desktop colorists. That’s right, this new version of both Resolve for Mac and Resolve Lite now include a new 3-Way Color Panel. See my accompanying blog post about the new 3Way interface and the modifiers you can use with it to enhance your experience grading with a mouse on Resolve.

iMac and MacBookPro Support

One of the big features of version 8 is Open-GL support, allowing Resolve to run on non-Nvidia cards (except for the new Noise Reduction feature which is CUDA – only and requires one of the supported NVidia cards). This opens up DaVinci from being a tower-only app to also running on iMacs and MacBookPros. Due to the limited architectures of these machines, DaVinci describes the ideal workflows for these two particular configurations:

MacBook Pro

Ideal for ‘SD Grading and SD / HD Shot Preview’ suited for:

  • On-set, pre-grade, previewing and training
  • Real-time processing of SD DPX files
  • Apply shot by shot ‘look’ grades to HD images (for later grading in a MacPro or Linux workstation)
  • Supports internal SATA or SSD storage options (BlackMagic recommends the biggest internal SSD you can afford for the best performance)

iMac

Best for ‘SD or HD 720p Grading’ suited for:

  • Pre-grade, Previewing and Training
  • Realtime processing of 720p images
  • Preview, grade, render HD images
  • Internal SATA or SSD storage options (again, they recommend a big internal SSD for performance with FireWire, USB, or Internal SATA only for low resolution images if realtime performance is required)

Resolve & Lite: Supported Configurations

Lite may be free but it’s still powerful and requires a very modern Graphics Processing board in iMacs and MacBook Pros for it to work properly. Version 8 was re-written to support Open-GL – the programming language that Apple has embraced for it’s graphics cards. For MacBook Pros, here’s the relevant  requirements for optimal performance of Resolve and Resolve Lite:

The MacBook Pro contains two GPUs; one for high performance graphics and the other for better battery life. It is essential to enter the Energy Saver preferences, in the System Preferences of Mac OS X, and select the high performance graphics option. Failing to do so will render Resolve unusable. On the mid 2009 model, set the Graphics radio button to “Higher Performance”. On the mid 2010 and early 2011 models, disable the “Automatic graphics switching” checkbox.

At the time of its release (Late July 2011) here are the specific MacBook Pro Specs:

  • 17-inch, Mid 2009, 2.8GHz Core 2 Duo
  • 17-inch, Mid 2009, 3.06GHz Core 2 Duo
  • 17-inch, Mid 2010, 2.53GHz Intel Core i5
  • 17-inch, Mid 2010, 2.66GHz Intel Core i7
  • 17-inch, Early 2011, 2.2GHz Intel Core i7
  • 17-inch, Early 2011, 2.3GHz Intel Core i7
  • Operating System: Mac OS X 10.6.7
  • RAM: 8 GB

Also as of late July 2011, here are the specific iMac Specs:

  • 21.5-inch, Mid 2011, 2.5GHz Intel Core i5
  • 21.5-inch, Mid 2011, 2.7GHz Intel Core i5
  • 21.5-inch, Mid 2011, 2.8GHz Intel Core i7
  • 27-inch, Mid 2011, 2.7GHz Intel Core i5
  • 27-inch, Mid 2011, 3.1GHz Intel Core i5
  • 27-inch, Mid 2011, 3.4GHz Intel Core i7
  • Operating System: Mac OS X 10.6.7
  • RAM: 8 GB

What About Mac OS Lion?

According to an email I received from BlackMagic – Resolve 8.0.1 and Resolve Lite 8.0.1 Public Beta are both Lion-ready. Decklink users should update to the latest drivers, which are also Lion-ready. I myself haven’t had time to test it. I suggest running these configurations on a separate boot drive or partition to make sure everything is working properly before putting it into a production situation.

More on latest Final Cut Pro X 10.0.3 latest update

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From article by Heath McKnight (http://heathmcknight.com/)

As usual, Apple has been listening to us and have introduced their second big FCP X update since the app “shipped” via the Mac App Store in late June 2011. We had the first update in September 2011, which brought XML, media stems and more; a minor bug fix in November; and now another major update for January 2012. I mention this first, because Apple usually released major updates to past versions of FCP every year or so. I believe FCP 7 only got two major updates and a minor one after it shipped in August 2009. So we’ve had just as many in seven months, and everything comes through quickly via the Mac App Store!Apple’s Richard Townhill, senior director of applications marketing, took time to talk on the latest major update to Final Cut Pro (http://www.apple.com/finalcutpro/), ver. 10.0.3. Apple is delivering multicam support, broadcast monitoring via third-party PCI-e cards and boxes (in beta, along with Thunderbolt), advanced chroma keying features, XML 1.1, the ability to import layered Photoshop graphics (PSD), and media relinking.

The big feature is Multicam, and as usual, Apple doesn’t just add in the feature to FCP X, but they make it better and easier to use. You can mix up to 64 different camera angles and sources, using mixed formats, codecs, frame rates and frame sizes, and also you can mix stills with the video. Syncing has always been tricky with multicamera editing, but FCP X makes it simple with their auto sync feature, which will sync up video and audio based on timecode (all cameras have to have matching timecode) or a time-and-date stamp (again, all cameras must match). You can also sync based on metadata, along with customizing that information. FCP X also goes a step further if you’re using the GoPro, HDSLRs or cameras that don’t match timecode or time-and-date. They use the audio from the cameras and match up the waveform and then sync the footage up that way. That’s pretty incredible! So if you’re shooting a three-camera production of an interview, FCP X will sync according to the audio waveforms of the person talking, or if you’re shooting a live event, like sports, it will find the similar audio waveforms and sync them up!

In beta right now is Broadcast Monitoring, which uses third-party PCI-e devices and cards, and Thunderbolt, which is still one of my favorite new features on pretty much all new Apple computers. AJA has already updated their drivers at www.aja.com, and feature the new ioXT Thunderbolt device (http://www.aja.com/products/io/io-xt.php), and Matrox and BlackMagic are working on some cool new Thunderbolt devices. You can also do on-set, in-the-field monitoring, as well! In fact, my sources told me Apple was working on broadcast monitoring back in July.

Apple also introduced more robust Chroma Keying controls, so it’s not only easy to do a quick key, you can also tweek it and perfect it, especially if your green- or bluescreen wasn’t lit well. No need to export to Motion or After Effects, plus you can view it in real-time, thanks to FCP X’s 64-bit architecture. Richard also mentioned that Jimmy Fallon and SNL use FCP X’s one-step chroma key feature, which is pretty cool.

Media Relink makes it easy to relink your footage, audio, etc., when you’re exporting or importing items from third-party software, such as color corrected footage, cleaned up audio, etc. It will also find footage that was transcoded, as well, which is great, since many of us prefer to use Apple ProRes and other codecs that are easy to cut with.

Richard talked a bit about my friend Philip Hodgetts (and his partner Greg’s) 7toX , which will allow you to bring Final Cut Pro 7 projects into Final Cut Pro X! That’s right, no more using two different FCP NLEs on old and new projects, just use the 7toX app and you’re ready to go. Make sure you read the information on the above link, because things obviously change when going from bins, etc., to FCP X. It’s only $9.99 and is already available on the Mac App Store.

7toX takes advantage of the new XML 1.1 feature, plus the update allows you to export to color correct in DaVinci Resolve and other third-party color correction apps. You can also “import and export audio keyframes and intrinsic effects parameters such as opacity and scale,” according to Apple.

While you could import and work with layered Photoshop graphics in Motion 5, you couldn’t in FCP X. The new 10.0.3 update allows you to do just that, which is a fantastic feature that many of us loved in FCP 7 and earlier.

Full rundown and details of the 10.0.3 update can be found athttp://www.apple.com/finalcutpro/software-update.html, plus the 30-day free trial of FCP X includes all the new updates, including those for Motion 5 and Compressor 4. Also of note are the third-party developers, which are putting out some great stuff for FCP X, including Red Giant Software (http://www.redgiantsoftware.com/), GenArt’s Saphire Edge (http://www.genarts.com/software/sapphire-edge/final-cut), FxFactory (http://www.noiseindustries.com/fxfactory/), and many others.

by Heath McNight

Want to learn more about Desktop Video?

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Click here is a downloadable pdf file (10.2Mb) that gives the best, most illustrative overview of how you can produce high quality video using BlackMagic Design products that Smarttec can supply and support.

Also available for download is the latest Desktop Video v9.2 beta

About Desktop Video Software

This software includes everything you need to set up your DeckLink, Multibridge, UltraStudio, Intensity and H.264 Pro Recorder for any task in your facility.

What’s new in Desktop Video 9.2 Beta 1

• Broadcast monitoring support for Final Cut Pro X

• Avid Media Composer 6 improvements

• Media Express 3.1

• DNxHD playback support for Media Express 3.1

Minimum system requirements for Mac OS X

UltraStudio 3D and Intensity Extreme

• Mac OS X 10.7 Lion or later.

• Mac OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard or later.

• Thunderbolt iMac, MacBook Pro or MacBook Air

• 4 GB of system memory.

DeckLink, Intensity and Multibridge products

• Mac OS X 10.7 Lion or later.

• Mac OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard or later.

• A suitable PCIe slot – PCIe x1 lane cards should work in any slot. PCIe x4 lane cards require a x4 lane or faster PCI Express slot.

• 4 GB of system memory.

H.264 Pro Recorder

• Mac OS X 10.7 Lion or later.

• Mac OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard or later.

• USB 2.0 connection.

• 4 GB of system memory.

Third Party Software Support

• Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5.1

• Adobe After Effects CS5.5

• Adobe Photoshop CS5.5

• Adobe Premiere Pro CS5

• Adobe After Effects CS5

• Adobe Photoshop CS5

• Apple Final Cut Pro X

• Apple Final Cut Pro 7

• Apple Motion 4

• Apple Soundtrack Pro 3

• Apple Color 1.5

• Apple DVD Studio Pro 4

• Avid Pro Tools 8

• Avid Media Composer 6

• Nuke

Installing Desktop Video Software

The drivers install components in to applications including Avid Media Composer 6,Final Cut Pro 7 and Final Cut Pro X, Adobe Premiere Pro, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe After Effects. If you have installed the drivers prior to installing any of these applications, we recommend that you uninstall and reinstall the drivers. This will ensure that all relevant components are installed in their required locations.

To remove the Desktop Video software out of your system, simply run the “Uninstall DeckLink” utility which is included on the CD or disk image.

Additional Information

Please check www.blackmagic-design.com for additional information on third party software compatibility and minimum system requirements.

Nvidia PCIe Quadro 4000 2GB Mac card

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Nvidia PCIe Quadro 4000 2GB Mac card

 

From now through until February 28th you can purchase the

nvidia Quadro 4000 card  (PCIe card) for Mac  $1,200 ex tax

Of course if you find a better offer give us a call – 02 9939 4000.

Quadro GPUs are the professional graphics solution of choice for the majority of Fortune 1000 companies. Featuring NVIDIA® Scalable Geometry Engine™ technology, the NVIDIA® Quadro® 4000 delivers excellent graphics and computer performance on design, animation and video applications for Mac and Windows. Applications include Apple Final Cut Pro, DaVinci Resolve, Autodesk Smoke, Mathworks Matlab and Adobe®  Creative Suite® 6 for blazing-fast performance and fluid interactivity when editing HD videos, creating visual effects and enhancing digital images.

Quadro 4000

Cuda Cores: 256
Frame Buffer: 2GB GDDR5
Memory Interface: 256-Bit
Memory Bandwidth: 89.6GB/s
Maximum Display: 2560×1600
Power Consumption: 142W
Form Factor: 4.376” H x 9.50” L Single Slot

Apple Update Final Cut Pro 10.0.3

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see:

Ultrastudio 3D <click here>

SPECIAL Blackmagic Thunderbolt UtraStudio 3D – Portable Thunderbolt based 3D capture and playback for SDI,HDMI and analog video offering uncompressed editing capability in HD, 2K and 3D on your new MacbookPro laptop.

Apple Updates Final Cut Pro X ( downloadable from App Store )


CUPERTINO, California—January 31, 2012—Apple® today released Final Cut Pro® X v10.0.3, a significant update to its revolutionary professional video editing application, which introduces multicam editing that automatically syncs up to 64 angles of video and photos; advanced chroma keying for handling complex adjustments right in the app; and enhanced XML for a richer interchange with third party apps and plug-ins that support the fast growing Final Cut Pro X ecosystem. Available today as a free update from the Mac® App Store™, Final Cut Pro X v10.0.3 also includes a beta of broadcast monitoring that supports Thunderbolt devices as well as PCIe cards.

Final Cut Pro X v10.0.3 includes a collection of groundbreaking new tools for editing multicam projects. Final Cut Pro X automatically syncs clips from your shoot using audio waveforms, time and date, or timecode to create a Multicam Clip with up to 64 angles of video, which can include mixed formats, frame sizes and frame rates. The powerful Angle Editor allows you to dive into your Multicam Clip to make precise adjustments, and the Angle Viewer lets you play back multiple angles at the same time and seamlessly cut between them.

Final Cut Pro X builds upon its robust, one-step chroma key with the addition of advanced controls including color sampling, edge adjustment and light wrap. You can tackle complex keying challenges right in Final Cut Pro X, without having to export to a motion graphics application, and view your results instantly with realtime playback.

In the seven months since launch, the third party ecosystem around Final Cut Pro X has expanded dramatically. XML-compatible software like DaVinci Resolve and CatDV provide tight integration for tasks such as color correction and media management. The new 7toX app from Intelligent Assistance uses XML to import Final Cut Pro 7 projects into Final Cut Pro X. In addition, some of the industry’s largest visual effects developers, including GenArts and Red Giant, have developed motion graphics plug-ins that take advantage of the speed and real-time preview capabilities of Final Cut Pro X.

Broadcast monitoring in Final Cut Pro X is currently in beta and allows you to connect to waveform displays, vectorscopes, and calibrated, high-quality monitors to ensure that your project meets broadcast specifications. Final Cut Pro X supports monitoring of video and audio through Thunderbolt I/O devices, as well as through third party PCIe cards.

Pricing & Availability
Final Cut Pro X v10.0.3 is available from the Mac App Store for $319.99 (Australian) to new users, or as a free update for existing Final Cut Pro X customers. A 30-day free trial of Final Cut Pro X is available at www.apple.com/finalcutpro/trial. Full system requirements and more information on Final Cut Pro X can be found at www.apple.com/finalcutpro.

Apple designs Macs, the best personal computers in the world, along with OS X, iLife, iWork and professional software. Apple leads the digital music revolution with its iPods and iTunes online store. Apple has reinvented the mobile phone with its revolutionary iPhone and App Store, and is defining the future of mobile media and computing devices with iPad.

Press Contacts:
Monica Sarkar
Apple
monica_sarkar@apple.com
(408) 862-3204

Lacey Haines
Apple
lhaines@apple.com
(408) 862-0985